Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology
Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology
Home | About JISP | Search | Accepted articles | Online Early | Current Issue | Archives | Instructions | SubmissionSubscribeLogin 
Users Online: 113  Home Print this page Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font sizeWide layoutNarrow layoutFull screen layout

   Table of Contents    
EDITORIAL
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 431  

S ccess without U…. Tough


Editor, Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology, Professor, Department of Periodontology, Institute of Dental Studies and Technologies, Kadrabad, Modi Nagar, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

Date of Web Publication16-Feb-2018

Correspondence Address:
Ashish Kumar
Editor, Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology, Professor, Department of Periodontology, Institute of Dental Studies and Technologies, Kadrabad, Modi Nagar, Ghaziabad, Uttar Pradesh
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jisp.jisp_70_18

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
Kumar A. S ccess without U…. Tough. J Indian Soc Periodontol 2017;21:431

How to cite this URL:
Kumar A. S ccess without U…. Tough. J Indian Soc Periodontol [serial online] 2017 [cited 2022 Aug 8];21:431. Available from: https://www.jisponline.com/text.asp?2017/21/6/431/225711





The presence of periodontal disease in a substantial percentage of Indian population is an obvious problem we have to deal with. This problem gets compounded when the evidence from the ongoing research is leading us to a direction which points to some relatioship between few systemic diseases and periodontal diseases. Although a lot of systemic diseases have been proposed to have some liking for periodontal diseases, but I still will talk about few, as only these diseses have been under extensive research for their relationship with periodontal disease.

As you would agree with me, there was some weight in the evidence provided by initial studies where in periodontal diseases were linked to systemic diseases, that is why, a new branch, “Periodontal medicine” saw the light of the day.

Almost 19 years have gone since the inception of Periodontal Medicine, we are still in various stages of research trying to prove our point to our friends in medical fraternity. May be the weak evidence that our studies have presented has not been able to convince our medical friends. Nevertheless the research will go on and a day would come when we will be able to prove that intervention of periodontal disease can reduce the risk of systemic disease. That time may not be very far away.

Despite the absence of conclusive evidence for preterm low birth weight, what stops us from collaboratingwith gyanecologists and working with them on importance of maintanence of oral and periodontal health during pregnancy. It is conclusively proven that pregnant females who do not maintain oral hygiene upto optimum standards have gingival enlargements and increased bleeding. We can convince them for compulsary periodontal checkup and scaling during pregnancy. May be a day would come, when this is implemented and gyanecologists would notice reduction in preterm low birth babies.

Despite the absence of conclusive evidence for relationship between diabetes and periodontal disesase, American Diabetic Association in Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2018 says that “Because periodontal disease is associated with diabetes, the utility of screening in a dental setting and referral to primary care as a means to improve the diagnosis of prediabetes and diabetes has been explored, with one study estimating that 30% of patients ≥30 years of age seen in general dental practices had dysglycemia. Further research is needed to demonstrate the feasibility, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of screening in this setting.”[1] At least this statement accepts that there is a relationship between diabetes and periodontal diseases. India is diabetes capital of the world. Why can't we collaborate with diabetologists and convince them for regular periodontal check up for their diabetic patients?

Despite the absence of conclusive evidence for relationship between cardiovascular and periodontal disesase, what is wrong in convincing our fellow cardiologists about the importance of maintanence of oral hygiene, considering the fact that mouth is the dirtiest part of the body with maximum number of microorganisms present. These microorganisms can enter blood stream and may become a risk factor.

Interesting fact of the matter is, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases are interlinked, pregnancy and diabetes have a link. Periodontitis may be one of the common factors between all the three.

“Together we can…. As working together works”



 
   References Top

1.
American Diabetes Association. Classification and diagnosis of diabetes: Standards of medical care in diabetes-2018. Diabetes Care 2018;41:S13-27.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]    




 

Top
   
 
  Search
 
  
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
    References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1328    
    Printed36    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded103    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal