Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology

EDITORIAL
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 25  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 183-

Plagiarism: Injurious to the academic health of the researcher and research! (Part-II)


Ashish Kumar 
 Editor, Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology, Professor and Head, Department of Periodontics, Dental College, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Lamphelpat, Imphal - 795 004, Manipur, India

Correspondence Address:
Ashish Kumar
Editor, Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology, Professor and Head, Department of Periodontics, Dental College, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Lamphelpat, Imphal - 795 004, Manipur
India




How to cite this article:
Kumar A. Plagiarism: Injurious to the academic health of the researcher and research! (Part-II).J Indian Soc Periodontol 2021;25:183-183


How to cite this URL:
Kumar A. Plagiarism: Injurious to the academic health of the researcher and research! (Part-II). J Indian Soc Periodontol [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Jun 22 ];25:183-183
Available from: https://www.jisponline.com/text.asp?2021/25/3/183/315430


Full Text

[AUTHOR:1]

In continuation of my editorial from previous issue, on plagiarism, I will briefly explain the remaining types of plagiarism. In my last editorial I had touched upon the problems which may arise with plagiarism and how it affects the scientific integrity of the researcher and explained the different types of plagiarism; namely complete plagiarism, verbatim/copy-and-paste/direct plagiarism, inaccurate authorship/misleading attribution, replicate publications, reuse/duplication/self-plagiarism.

Secondary sources/Inaccurate citation: This is a type of plagiarism where in authors cite primary source and do not cite the secondary source from where they got the reference for primary source. For example, some gets a reference for Miller's classification of gingival recession (primary source) from a review article published in 2020 and uses this reference of 1985 and does not cite that review article of 2020 (secondary source) from where the authors got the Miller's classification reference. This gives readers a false sense of extensive research done by authors. In this case, it shows as if authors have read the original article of 1985 but the reality is not so. This also fails to recognize the authors of the review article and their work/publication and notwithstanding that their work was used but was not cited.[1]

Invalid sources/Misleading citation: Referencing an incorrect source leads to this type of plagiarism. This may occur due to authors carelessness or not giving due importance to referencing. The idea behind this type of mistake may not be to mislead.[1]

Paraphrasing/Intellectual theft: Changing the words from original source of someone else's writing and crafting it in a way that idea or research is novel although it is taken from an uncited document. It may be rewriting the matter maintaining the original concept or mere change of words.[1]

Repetitive research/Self-plagiarism:

When an author uses the material (text or data or both) from a comparable study with a comparable methodology in a fresh study without proper acknowledgement. This often happens when authors tend to duplicate studies on interconnected topics with parallel results without citing the earlier research.[1]

I was amazed to hear from Dr. Mark Bartold in one of his recent webinars conducted for The Indian Society of Periodontology, where I had the honor of sharing webinar platform with him as speaker, that the journals blacklist people who regularly submit plagiarized manuscripts. Although we at JISP have not applied this idea, but I feel this is a good idea to emulate, considering that there is a high volume of manuscripts which get rejected because of plagiarism.

References

1Eassom H. 10 Types of Plagiarism in Research; 2016. Available from: https://www.wiley.com/network/researchers/submission-and-navigating-peer-review/10-types-of-plagiarism-in-research. [Last accessed on 2021 Jan 09].